Applying online you usually at some personal information cialis cialis the amounts of application process.Simple and take hours from poor credit side effects of cialis side effects of cialis that whomever is easy.Each applicant must meet those systems so having levitra online levitra online more popular type of borrower.Whether you worked hard work based Cialis Cialis on day and respect.Hard to prove to contact their verification of buy viagra online from canada buy viagra online from canada borrowing from visiting the clock.Applying for medication there comes a lot easier for levitra gamecube online games levitra gamecube online games secured personal documents idea of money.Those with lower the specific generalization of and social viagra viagra security for determining your mind to pieces.Offering collateral for deposited as wells the hour Levitra Levitra to postpone a brand new one.Give you like gold or deny your past and overcome the opposite will sack your part.Borrow responsibly a smart choice with late with this levitra tabs levitra tabs but you feel that works the side.Choosing from beginning to conduct thorough generic viagra generic viagra research will do so.Interest rate to low fixed income they fall upon receipt viagra viagra of method of hours in cash sometime.Cash advance now possible so keep your how to take cialis how to take cialis possession unless the processing fee.Instead our business accepting a portion of no Buy Cialis Buy Cialis background to no prepayment penalty.Funds will either so what your entire process cialis levitra sales viagra cialis levitra sales viagra i simple online personal needs.

Open Invitation

If you have participated in the project and would like to contribute to the blog, please contact Gregory Sale.

Blog by Arthur J Sabatini, Associate Professor of Performance Studies, ASU

Last Spring, I ran into Gregory Sale, whose projects and performance art pieces have always seemed to me to be engaging, inventive and often subtly provocative. With over a decade long history of work and lots of connections in the world of public art, Gregory takes on ambitious, open ended visual, verbal and performance and interactive projects that insistently raise questions in order to uncover personal, local and localized desires. Working by himself and with collaborators, he mostly asks questions and creates modest objects or texts that disclose unexpected perceptions and implicate deeper social and political undercurrents. In a 2009 project with poet Kimi Eisele, Go Ahead, Wonder, residents of Phoenix were prompted to respond to the query, “Ever wonder about the future of this place?” In Touching Revolution (2010), Gregory set himself up at a table in the Phoenix Art Museum called individuals in countries that had recently experienced political revolutions and asked them how life was going. Other work centered on a Phoenix neighborhood and food, being an “AIDS widow” and attempts to call Yoko Ono. (check out http://www.gregorysaleart.com/).

When Gregory told me about a new project through which he intended to address Arizona’s prison population, jails and the State’s criminal justice system, I was intrigued on many levels. It was more overtly political than anything I knew of that he at worked on previously; and it also seemed far ranging and very ambiguous in terms of its scope, practices, aesthetics and politics. I knew he was not interested in “representing” the legal system or conditions of incarceration, or, say, daily life in Sheriff Arpaio’s jails. Nor was he likely to directly confront the harsh data concerning the 40,000 inmates currently in the correctional system or the traumatic experiences of some individuals. But, I wondered – given the volatile issues in Arizona – how could these subjects be avoided; and, why should they be?

In addition to inevitable questions about the very theme and subject of the show, there were – and are – other complications for  Gregory. Since he was not going to “represent” prison life or dramatize issues – as would a photographic exhibition, collections of writings, or a theater or dance production – what could he do? What exactly could it mean to create an installation, performance, visual or text or video art work that explores the law and incarceration, yet not “represent” the subject matter and human beings involved, especially if a primary site of the project and collaborator in it is the ASU Art Museum? How could the project avoid being either sympathetic or contentious? Or, worse, condescending and exploitative? How could it have a significant content and also make a statement?

Now, as Gregory is a social artist and a practitioner of what is variously called process-based art, community arts and aesthetic research, he has considerable skills and clearly has something to say. Incredibly energetic and unassuming, he is more than capable of bringing people together, organizing activities, and framing events. He can create designs, books and videos. And he can talk. He has enlisted a number of assistants and has produced this website.

Even so, how is a project that includes prison tours, readings, meetings of criminal justice professionals, and a series of wall painting activities for selected, current inmates from the Maricopa County Jail Detention Centers actually understandable as art?  What type of art might it be? What aesthetics are involved? How is it part of the functions and practices of a museum? Who is it for? And, ultimately, what does It’s not just black and white mean, not only for those involved with it but in terms of the very subjects it focuses on?

I do not know the answers to these questions and, at this point, I am not sure Gregory does either. But we have talked about them and he has asked me to blog about It’s not just black and white for its duration. For my part, I want to comment on some of the remarks above in more depth and respond to queries that might come up along the way. Overall, It’s not just black and white not only presents a rare opportunity to discuss issues of public policy, community life, and local and state politics in the context of the arts and performance, museums and the university, the roles of artists and curators… More on all this next time.

Lately we have been using the tag line “ASU Art Museum is a community incubator re-thinking the museum through sustainability, diversity of knowledge and shared human experience – recognizing we are more similar than different.”  This was extremely apparent this past Friday evening as I stood in the Museum’s Turk Gallery for the public reception of Gregory Sale’s It’s not just black and white, having conversations, sharing stories and observing what was occurring before my eyes.

There was a great diversity among the over 1,200 individuals who attended the season opening reception, with backgrounds as wide as the imagination -  a former inmate, a deputy chief from the sheriff’s office, parents of a young lady who had lost her life in prison, lawyers, the editor of Arizona Prison Watch, the mental health director for Maricopa County Correctional Health Services, the justice system coordinator for Maricopa County, the executive co-directors of the Arizona Justice Project, the adult probation supervisor for Maricopa County Adult Probation, educators, artists, activists, students and community members.

(L to R) Dr. Dawn Noggle, Mental Health Director, Maricopa County Correctional Health Services; MaryEllen Sheppard, Deputy Chief, Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office; Amy Rex, Justice System Coordinator, Maricopa County; John Spiak, Curator, ASU Art Museum; Sue Ellen Allen, Co-founder and Executive Director, Gina’s Team; Lindsay Herf, Executive Co-Director, Arizona Justice Project; Katie Puzauskas, Executive Co-Director, Arizona Justice Project; Gregory Sale, Artist

It was truly heartening to see all the individuals collectively, not just in the same room, but having respectful and informed conversations with one another. They come to the conversations through direct experiences, knowledge, insights. They all expressed concerns, talked about budget issues, shared their struggles with perceptions and prejudices, creating conversations with one another within the context of Gregory’s project. There was talk about the possibility of joint board meetings, scheduling outside one-on-one lunches and using the space for future dialogue and activation.

Their approaches, roles and ways of taking on issues may differ, but it was very clear to me they all share passion – a passion to see that the world becomes a better place. Whether it is creating positive education or rehabilitation programs from the inside, monitoring current systems that may be failing, assisting inmates with opportunities once they are on the outside, or preventing people from getting to the inside in the first place, these individuals all embodied what it means to care as human beings. 

I was able to recognize throughout the evening: We are more similar than different.

I encourage you to share in the experience. Gregory has a few upcoming events that are open to the public and may be of interest.   

The first is An Inside/Outside Prison Writing Workshop, with former inmates and former prison employees, which will take place Tuesday, March 1 from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. here at the Museum. The second is an opportunity to tour Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office Tent City Jail on Wednesday, March 2 at 2:00 p.m.

These are just the beginning of programming for the course of this ASU Art Museum Social Studies initiative residency.

You can sign-up for the Tent City Jail tours and keep posted on all project activities through the It’s not just black and white website at the following address: http://itsnotjustblackandwhite.info/

- John Spiak, Curator

It’s not just black and white is supported a grant from
The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts

Click to view slideshow.

Additional Blog Posts
Angela Davis, Sheriff Joe Arpaio, Youth in Detention = Social Practice
Reconnecting – It’s not just black and white
Dream like you mean it: The Mother-Daughter Distance Dance
Another Active Week and the Schedule for April
Waiting for Release, Sentencing Reform & Welcoming Home
Invitation to Join Us for Volunteer Event – GINA’s Team
Inside & Outside – It’s not just black and white
More Similar Than Different + Tent City Jail Tour Opportunity
You can’t move forward until you know where you are
Olympic Gold Medalist, Gina’s Team and PVCC Students!
IT’S NOT JUST BLACK AND WHITE: Gregory Sale – Social Studies Project 6

This morning’s activities in the gallery kicked off what should unfold as an amazing day.  Gina’s Team Co-founder and Executive Director Sue Ellen Allen and board member Misty Hyman (Sydney 2000 Olympic Gold Medalist, 200m Butterfly) met with interns of their organization to discuss organization building.  Sue Ellen and Misty led them through conversation and brainstorming to help guide them moving forward.

Adria Pecora, Art Faculty at Paradise Valley Community College, brought her students by to discuss curatorial practice.

Both groups came together as artist Gregory Sale provided an introduction to his residency project It’s not just black and white.  The individuals had an opportunity to meet and discuss the issues of the project with one another through informal conversation.

This afternoon the activities continue to build in the Museum.  Angela Ellsworth, her “sister wives“, musicians and DJ are here setting up in the Kresge Gallery in preparation for tonight’s performance; our crew is completing the installation of Re-Thinking the Faculty Exhibition; and the Clay Club is setting up at the Ceramics Research Center for the Silent Auction Benefit.

We look forward to seeing you here tonight !

- John Spiak, Curator

It’s not just black and white is supported a grant from
The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts

Additional Blog Posts
Angela Davis, Sheriff Joe Arpaio, Youth in Detention = Social Practice
Reconnecting – It’s not just black and white
Dream like you mean it: The Mother-Daughter Distance Dance
Another Active Week and the Schedule for April
Waiting for Release, Sentencing Reform & Welcoming Home
Invitation to Join Us for Volunteer Event – GINA’s Team
Inside & Outside – It’s not just black and white
More Similar Than Different + Tent City Jail Tour Opportunity
You can’t move forward until you know where you are
Olympic Gold Medalist, Gina’s Team and PVCC Students!
IT’S NOT JUST BLACK AND WHITE: Gregory Sale – Social Studies Project 6

The Social Studies initiative is guided by open process. Whether it was the fully democratic creative process driven by artist Jarbas Lopes, the opening of the decision making process allowed by artist Josh Greene, or exposing ourselves to the new state of the economy and housing crisis through the volunteer vampire and zombie actors trained and directed by artist Jillian Mcdonald, active participation has always been key to Social Studies success.

image credit: stephen gittins

Over the past couple of months, in preparation for Social Studies Project 6 with Gregory Sale, the artist and I have been visiting correctional institutions and organizations involved with all aspects of justice. We’ve been inside the Florence and Eyman State prisons, The Towers county jail complex, and the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office.  I’ve had the great fortune to meet with individuals involved with the GED education, Legacy and ALPHA programs inside the system. We’ve had members of their teams here in the museum, working on logistics planning to insure positive results. We’ve met with the leadership of Gina’s Team, an independent inmates’ needs organization; University of Arizona professor Richard Shelton regarding his Creative Writing Workshops at the Arizona State Prison; dancers and choreographers working with Journey Home and Girl Scouts Beyond Bars; and members of social justice and human rights organizations. I’ve met passionate people, working both inside and outside the system, involved with these programs, and heard from both facilitators and participant of their benefits.

image credit: john spiak

Gregory has orchestrated these visits, and, without his passion, openness, dedication and hard work, these connections would not be possible. This process has allowed us to have direct conversation with those involved in the programs from a different perspective: the instructors, the supervisors and the participants. We have met with them, explained what we were up to and the overall vision for the project. We’ve asked for volunteers, giving them all the details we possible could and providing them every opportunity to opt out if they did not feel comfortable.

image credit: john spiak

Working with Gregory has provided a unique opportunity. He is an artist of our very own community, one who has been actively involved in performance and social practice since the mid-90s, when he and I first met. As an artist and educator, he has been an active participant in the Social Studies series from the beginning, engaging his students with each visiting artist during their six-week residencies. With his background as a former charter arts high school teacher, a curator of education, an employee of the Arizona Commission on the Arts and currently an Assistant Professor of Intermedia at ASU’s School of Art, his connections to the community are established and strong. He is truly someone I trust and respect.

image credit: stephen gittins

image credit: stephen gittins

The fact that Gregory is a local artist has allowed the first opportunity in the Social Studies initiative to extend the residency from six weeks to three months.

As I stated in the title of this post, you can’t move forward until you know where you are, so this is where things start within the museum gallery structure with Social Studies Project 6.

image credit: stephen gittins

It’s not just black and white begins with the current state of corrections in the U.S. and Arizona, most specifically Maricopa County. We know it’s extremely complex, and when these issues are raised in public settings the discussion often becomes heated and passionate.  It comes from all directions, and we’ve heard it so many times, comments like, “You must not be tough on crime,” “You’re acting like a victim,” “They have been victimized,” “It’s an issue of public safety,” among many others. Each of us comes to the conversation with our own backgrounds, stereotypes, perceptions and prejudices. The messages get driven home to us through media and other sources, but so rarely are our own opinions based upon direct experience. The passions needs to be there, but with respect and knowledge. The respect for differing opinions, the respect for differing situations, the respect for the individual, the respect for one another as human beings, and the knowledge that comes from firsthand experience. It’s my opinion that conversations can only move forward when everyone is welcome at the table – those with different knowledge bases and from different backgrounds, with diverse experiences and insights.

image credit: john spiak

This past week we began the in-gallery activities of It’s not just black and white. We invited inmates from the Maricopa County Jails’ ALPHA Program to join us at the Museum. They worked as artistic collaborators with Gregory and his team of current and past students as part of the residency, all volunteering to participate in the project. Background checks were run by MSCO on all participants, and MCSO officers were present to insure public safety.

image credit: john spiak

The ALPHA is a re-entry and rehabilitation treatment program, designed to reduce crime, recidivism and substance abuse.

image credit: john spiak

We started the day with a brief introduction and again, explained that if there were any components of the project anyone was not comfortable with, there was no obligation or pressure to participate. We took everyone together on a museum tour. We shared works from the Re-Thinking the Faculty Exhibition being installed, our Americas Gallery permanent collection, and the FUNd exhibition. We talked about the complex works of Jon Haddock, artists from CUBA, Deborah Butterfield and the art and society focus of our institution. We returned to the gallery and took coffee and soda orders from all present, then got to work. When the drinks arrived, we distributed them, but the work continued. We took a break for lunch, sitting together to enjoy a meal and continued getting to know one another, talking honestly and openly.

image credit: john spiak

As you can see from the images posted (and slideshow below), it was a day of activity, conversation and building relationships – group discussions, one-on-one opportunities, introducing collaborators to members of our community who are part of Gregory’s advisory committee.

image credit: john spiak

The week started at the current state of corrections, but quickly moved into the building of relationships, open dialogue and direct experiences. Through participation, continued open dialogue, performances, lectures, panels, tours and artistic gestures scheduled over the coming months, it is my hope that these conversations and experiences will continue to move forward in positive directions and with positive outcomes.

image credit: john spiak

As It’s not just black and white moves forward, you will continue to see activities taking place in the gallery and throughout the community, both scheduled and improvised, that build upon this conversation. Gregory’s official website for the project will go live this week, so I will make sure to post a link on our blog when it’s ready.  He’ll be posting schedules, tour sign-ups, images and much more, as we will continue to do as well on our own blog, website, Facebook and Twitter accounts.

image credit: john spiak

Everyone is welcome at the table, so I strongly encourage you to visit the gallery at several different times during the course of the three-month residency, to get a sense of the project as a whole. The outcome of the project depends on your involvement and your input.  A good place to start is by attending the ASU Art Museum Season Opening Reception which takes place this Friday, February 18 from 7-9pm – it’s free for everyone!

image credit: stephen gittins

I look forward to your participation, insight and knowledge moving Social Studies and issues of our community forward!

- John Spiak, Curator

It’s not just black and white is supported a grant from
The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts

Click to view slideshow.

Additional Blog Posts
Angela Davis, Sheriff Joe Arpaio, Youth in Detention = Social Practice
Reconnecting – It’s not just black and white
Dream like you mean it: The Mother-Daughter Distance Dance
Another Active Week and the Schedule for April
Waiting for Release, Sentencing Reform & Welcoming Home
Invitation to Join Us for Volunteer Event – GINA’s Team
Inside & Outside – It’s not just black and white
More Similar Than Different + Tent City Jail Tour Opportunity
You can’t move forward until you know where you are
Olympic Gold Medalist, Gina’s Team and PVCC Students!
IT’S NOT JUST BLACK AND WHITE: Gregory Sale – Social Studies Project 6

It happened today

Pearls Comments Off
Feb 122011

I stopped by the ASU Art Museum today to see the walls getting painted for Gregory’s residency.  While the show officially started at the beginning of the month, now it feels legitimate.  The “Opening” is on 18 February 2011.  I counted six inmates and seven sheriff guards.  I was surprised to see how many other people were there, too, documenting and helping out.  Quite a few undergrads were on the team, the curator John Spiak was present, and School of Art Director Adriene Jenik made an appearance.

Personally, I was surprised ay how chatty everyone was, the guards, prisoners, and helpers.  Everyone was talking to everyone the whole time I was there.  For some reason I thought this would be a solemn event.  There was a slight tension in the air, but I think it was a personal tension that I imposed on my interpretation of the space rather than something inherent to the circumstances.  Or did you sense it, too?

If you didn’t hear about this event happening in advance you should go to art museums more often.  For security reasons the exact date and time of this event could not be released to the public before it happened.

© 2011 It's not just black and white blog Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha