Here is a list of all the events that took place as part of the It's not just black and white residency exhibition at ASU Art Museum in 2011. Program activities were organized by three criteria:

PEARLS
Pearls were a series of artistic gestures or collaborative artistic workshops and activities. These programs provided an artistic framing for the overall project.

(re)SEARCH
Through (re)SEARCH, project participants were able to explore the impact of modern criminal justice through direct experience of fact-based tours and forums.

OPEN BOOKINGS
Open Bookings established a shared space for public programming during times not set aside for the previously identified activities. This flexible space for classes, performances and discourse was shared by individuals and organizations demonstrating a sustained interest in civil justice and contemporary practices of law and order.

Access: Multiple calendars were developed and presented within the gallery, on the exhibition website and on the museum blog, announcing programs and performances.  The residency exhibition temporarily repurposed a museum gallery as an artist’s studio, and Gregory Sale working with community partners often determined, based on the needs of an individual program, whether to open or close the gallery to the public. Each calendar listing notified the public if the event was (OPEN to the public), (CLOSED to the public) or alternatively (gallery OPEN, meeting CLOSED). Some activities took place in sites outside the museum gallery.

FEBRUARY

2/1 Thinking About Re -Thinking. Is the Museum Defunct? Can it shed the elitist and colonial past? Can it be remade?  
(OPEN to the public)
In collaboration with ASU Art Museum, the School of Art and the Museum Studies Program, contemporary models under which it operates. Darren Petrucci, Director of the ASU School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, moderated; Gordon Knox, Director of the ASU Art Museum, argued for a new, socially engaged museum; Richard Toon, Director of Museum Studies, exposed that the inherent contradictions of the museum are why it continually changes, why it must be continually rethought and why there is no such thing as the museum; and Gregory Sale discussed the appeal and perils of museum involvement from the artist’s point of view, and he read prepared comments by Adriene Jenik, Director of the School of Art.

2/8 A Manifesto of Yes: Optimistic Practices with Curator Ian Berry, Tang Teaching Museum, Saratoga Springs, NY
(OPEN to the public)
As a second in the series of Re-Thinking the Museum programs, Ian Berry discussed collaborative exhibitions, contemporary art projects and artworks and a class he taught recently in Tennessee. This presentation was a second in the series of Re-Thinking the Museum programs designed to provide a steady flow of acute perspectives on the role of art, critical analysis, and cultural institutions, which advance the circulation of ideas.       

2/9 Art Now Seminar                                                                                     
(OPEN to the public)
Art historian and ASU Professor Claudia Mesch conducted a session of her Art Now seminar in the exhibition space and engaged in a dialogue with artist Gregory Sale. Discussions focused on relational aesthetics and social art practice in which the value of the work is held in the relationships built around the work as well as the aesthetics of the work. The session explored how It’s not just black and white created a locally centered, activist, but widely dispersed or open-ended project, and it considered the museum as an artistic frame, and collaborative artistic production as “art” but with non-artists.

2/12 First Visit: Painting with ALPHA Program Inmates                                                          
(CLOSED to the public) 
Inmates enrolled in the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office reentry/rehabilitation program (ALPHA) worked with Gregory Sale and artistic collaborators to create a museum installation featuring painted black-and-white striped walls that mimicked the visual imagery of standard-issue inmate uniforms. An informal team of artist collaborators, Museum staff and Maricopa County Special Response Team Officers additionally supported the work. The three striped walls became the most explicit visual framework for It's not just black and white. The participants/collaborators also contributed to a fourth “open” wall of the installation by writing, drawing or recording their thoughts about the current system of incarceration. The opening and closing receptions for It's not just black and white and all seminars, film screenings, readings, class meetings and dialogues took place against this defining backdrop. 

2/18 Gina’s Team Member Meeting                                                                           
(gallery OPEN, meeting CLOSED) 
Gina’s Team co-founder and director Sue Ellen Allen and board member Misty Hyman (Sydney 2000 Olympic Gold Medalist) met with interns from their organization to discuss organization-building and to brainstorm new strategies for their work to address female inmates' needs. Gina’s Team contributes to inmate education and improved social skills, thus creating better citizens, smoother re-entry and more peaceful and constructive communities both in and out.

2/18 Paradise Valley Community College Gallery Dialogue                       
(OPEN to the public) 
Paradise Valley Community College art students and artist and art professor Adria Pecora met with Gregory Sale to consider the issues and structure of It’s not just black and white as a springboard for a discussion on how curatorial practice and art practice can intermingle.

2/18 It’s not just black and white Opening Reception                                              
(OPEN to the public) 
The residency exhibition was formally opened to the public, with over 1,200 individuals in attendance from a diverse range of backgrounds – art world, corrections/criminal justice, social justice/activism, museum patrons, civic leaders. Video documentation of the painting of the gallery walls was shown periodically throughout the opening. Multiple calendars were developed for ensuing programs and presented within the gallery, on the exhibition website and on the museum blog, announcing programs and performances, as well as opportunities to participate in Tent City Jail tours. Individuals and organizations demonstrating a sustained engagement in civil justice and themes of the project were invited to reserve the gallery for classes, meetings, workshops, etc.       

2/26 Second Visit: Painting with ALPHA Program Inmates                                                    
(CLOSED to the public)
A second team of inmates enrolled in the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office reentry/rehabilitation program (ALPHA), along with artist collaborators, Museum staff and corrections officers, worked to complete the museum installation. The installation then served as an instructional platform featuring public forums, panel discussions, social actions and artistic gestures. The changing “open wall” filled in by inmates and visitors to the gallery suggested a street-level and community-level engagement available to all.

2/28 Art and Politics Seminar                                                                          
(gallery OPEN, meeting CLOSED) 
Claudia Mesch’s ASU Art and Politics seminar class visited the exhibition space to engage in a dialogue with Gregory Sale. Museumgoers were invited to observe. Group discussions tracked an evolution from art as activism, to going beyond institutional critique, to projects that explore and at times defy institutional structures and disciplinary borders.


MARCH

3/1 Inside/Outside Prison Writing Workshop                                                          
(OPEN to the public)
Published authors who were former convicts, and published authors who were former prison workers, read from their prospective text to each other across the table and to an audience, along with prison writing-workshop volunteers leading interactive writing exercises. The program featured Ken Lamberton, writer and ex-prisoner; Jerry Marzinsky, writer and retired prison psychologist; and Erec Toso, poet and University of Arizona professor. Co-organized with Richard Shelton, poet and University of Arizona Regents Professor, and co-sponsored by University of Arizona Poetry Center, the program built on Richard Shelton’s thirty years as a prison volunteer in state and federal prison.

3/2 First Tent City Jail Tour                                                                                                    
(OPEN to the public with advanced registration: off-site) 
The first bi-weekly tour was offered to twenty museum participants per tour at the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office Tent City Jail. The public could register on the residency/exhibition’s website. Group size was limited to twenty adults over age eighteen. Because jails and prisons are the centerpiece of modern criminal justice, these tours were designed to explore the impact of modern criminal justice through direct experience. Tours were conducted by Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office personnel and, by definition, were not explicitly artistic or aesthetic. Admission was free.

3/3 A Mother-Daughter Distance Dance: Mother Dance Practice
(CLOSED to the public: off-site at Estrella Jail)
A dance practice session for the mothers participating in A Mother/Daughter Distance Dance program. This dance workshop series involved incarcerated women and their daughters, all preparing for a workshop in which the daughters, while on a visit to the museum, performed for and with their incarcerated mothers, while their mothers danced at Estrella Jail. The two sites were to be connected virtually through a live video feed. Choreographer Elizabeth Johnson and dancer Teniqua Broughton led the program.

3/9 Women and Social Change course session working to support the community service work of Gina’s Team
(galley OPEN: public may observe and participate during Q & A)
Students enrolled in the Women and Social Change course and ASU Professor Dr. Alesha Durfee of Women and Gender Studies worked with Gregory Sale to raise public awareness of women interfacing with the criminal justice system. The students also worked to develop a media campaign for the work of Gina’s Team. The students (with the support of some art students) began a process of designing a social action/ temporary public art project, Let’s Go to Prison, for the ASU campus, to bring attention to the death of prison inmate Marcia Powell, 48, who died May 20, 2009, after being held in an outdoor cage in Goodyear’s Perryville prison for at least four hours in the sun with temperatures around 107 degrees. The students also organized a roundtable discussion, Incarceration: Women and Social Change.

3/11 Welcome Home event with State Representative Cecil Ash (R-Mesa, AZ)                         
(OPEN to the public)

The featured guest, Representative Cecil Ash, addressed the importance of sentencing reform and the vital work of Welcome Home-type programs to impact lives, save tax dollars, and reduce recidivism. Gina’s Team extends a welcoming hand to women desperate to successfully rebuild their lives after periods of incarceration. A new Gina’s Team program, Welcome Home, offers support and mentoring in the first five days of returning to society for women incarcerated for over eight years. Additional speakers included Jan Weathers, Re-Entry coordinator, and Karen Hellman, Counseling & Treatment Services Program Manager, both of the Arizona Department of Corrections; and Sue Ellen Allen, a former inmate of Perryville prison and co-founder of Gina’s Team.

3/12 A Mother-Daughter Distance Dance: Daughter Dance Practice
(CLOSED to the public)
A dance practice session for the daughters participating in A Mother/Daughter Distance Dance program. This dance workshop series involved incarcerated women and their daughters, all preparing for a workshop in which the daughters, while on a visit to the museum, performed for and with their incarcerated mothers, while their mothers danced at Estrella Jail. The two sites were to be connected virtually through a live video feed. Choreographer Elizabeth Johnson and dancer Teniqua Broughton led the program. 

3/15 Art’s Role in Resilience Science and other Innovations in Thinking
(OPEN to the public) 
This discussion reported from what may be called “the new Renaissance” in thinking, in which scientists and artists collaborate in experiments aimed at expanding scientific knowledge. The discussants, among them scientists, artists, arts administrators and cultural critics who work in interdisciplinary models, argued against the notion that art and science are two discrete cultures. The discussion was part of the Resilience Innovation and Sustainability: Navigating the Complexities of Global Change conference at ASU. The group, from all over the world, gathered to discuss how artists and scientists can and do work together on topics of vital importance to health and wellbeing of our planet. Among those that spoke were conference attendees from Mongolia, South African, Sweden, and Chile. Local voices included, for example, Mathew Moore, a Phoenix artist who has documented the transformation of his family’s farmland outside Phoenix into suburban housing. The discussion was framed by Sander van der Leeuw, Dean, ASU School of Sustainability; Gordon Knox, Director, ASU Art Museum; Richard Toon, Director, Museum Studies; and Adriene Jenik, Director, School of Art; and was moderated by Gregory Sale.

3/19 A Mother-Daughter Distance Dance: Daughter Dance Practice
(CLOSED to the public) 
A dance practice session for the daughters participating in A Mother/Daughter Distance Dance program. This dance workshop series involved incarcerated women and their daughters, all preparing for a workshop in which the daughters, while on a visit to the museum, performed for and with their incarcerated mothers, while their mothers danced at Estrella Jail. The two sites were to be connected virtually through a live video feed. Choreographer Elizabeth Johnson and dancer Teniqua Broughton led the program.

3/19 Second Tent City Jail Tour                                                                                                          
(OPEN to the public with advanced registration: off-site) 
The second bi-weekly tour of Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office Tent City Jail was offered to twenty museum participants. The public could register on the project’s website. Group size was limited to twenty adults over age eighteen. Because jails and prisons are the centerpiece of modern criminal justice, these tours were designed to explore the impact of modern criminal justice through direct experience. Tours were conducted by Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office personnel and, by definition, were not explicitly artistic or aesthetic. Admission was free.

3/22 A Mother-Daughter Distance Dance: Mother Dance Practice
(CLOSED to the public: off-site at Estrella Jail) 
A dance practice session for the daughters participating in A Mother/Daughter Distance Dance program. This dance workshop series involved incarcerated women and their daughters, all preparing for a workshop in which the daughters, while on a visit to the museum, performed for and with their incarcerated mothers, while their mothers danced at Estrella Jail. The two sites were to be connected virtually through a live video feed. Choreographer Elizabeth Johnson and dancer Teniqua Broughton led the program.

3/22 Barry Scheck: Policy Reform and the Criminal Justice System in Arizona
(OPEN to the public)
Barry Scheck, Co-Founder and Co-Director of the Innocence Project, spoke on breakthrough work in using DNA testing to exonerate wrongfully convicted people and implementing policy reforms to prevent future injustice. The Innocence Project’s cases often result in enhancing public awareness of systemic problems, improving the criminal justice system, and legislative reform. The program was co-organized by Katie Puzauskas, Case and Programs Coordinator, Arizona Justice Project, Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law, and Larry Hammond, Partner, Osborn Maledon.         

3/24 A Mother-Daughter Distance Dance: Daughter Dance Practice
(CLOSED to the public: off-site at School of Art) 
A dance practice session for the daughters participating in A Mother/Daughter Distance Dance program. This dance workshop series involved incarcerated women and their daughters, all preparing for a workshop in which the daughters, while on a visit to the museum, performed for and with their incarcerated mothers, while their mothers danced at Estrella Jail. The two sites were to be connected virtually through a live video feed. Choreographer Elizabeth Johnson and dancer Teniqua Broughton led the program.

3/29 It’s not just black and white Community Advisory Committee Meeting                
(CLOSED to the public)  
With seven weeks of the residency/exhibition remaining, the advisory committee convened to assess project status and goals. Members included Shelley Cohn, arts advocate; Nancy Dallett, Public Historian, ASU School of History; Bill Hart, Senior Policy Analyst, ASU Morrison Institute for Public Policy; Adriene Jenik, Professor and Director, ASU School of Art; Heather Lineberry, senior curator and associate director, ASU Art Museum; Jeremy Mussman, deputy director, Maricopa Public Defender’s Office and member, Arizona Attorneys for Criminal Justice; Amy Rex, manager, Criminal Justice Projects, Maricopa County Manager’s Office; Matthew Salenger, architect and artist, colab studio; Arthur J. Sabatini, Associate Professor of Performance Studies, ASU College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences; and Arnim Wiek, Assistant Professor, ASU School of Sustainability.

3/30 A Mother-Daughter Distance Dance: Mother Dance Practice
(CLOSED to the public: off-site at Estrella Jail)
A dance practice session for the daughters participating in A Mother/Daughter Distance Dance program. This dance workshop series involved incarcerated women and their daughters, all preparing for a workshop in which the daughters, while on a visit to the museum, performed for and with their incarcerated mothers, while their mothers danced at Estrella Jail. The two sites were to be connected virtually through a live video feed. Choreographer Elizabeth Johnson and dancer Teniqua Broughton led the program.

3/31 A Mother-Daughter Distance Dance: Daughter Dance Practice                    
(CLOSED to the public: off-site at School of Art) 
A dance practice session for the daughters participating in A Mother/Daughter Distance Dance program. This dance workshop series involved incarcerated women and their daughters, all preparing for a workshop in which the daughters, while on a visit to the museum, performed for and with their incarcerated mothers, while their mothers danced at Estrella Jail. The two sites were to be connected virtually through a live video feed. Choreographer Elizabeth Johnson and dancer Teniqua Broughton led the program. 


APRIL

4/2 A Mother-Daughter Distance Dance                                                                   
(CLOSED to the public) 
Daughters at the art museum performed for and with their incarcerated mothers, while their mothers danced at Estrella Jail. The two sites were connected virtually through a live SKYPE video feed. Two-dozen “witnesses” observed the workshop, specifically in order to honor the interpersonal connection between the participants. The idea of mothers and daughters dancing, together but apart, explores the real and too-little-discussed impact of our incarceration system on all of us, as individuals and as a community. The viewers’ experience of the distance between the mothers and daughters – of which they were already well aware – was heightened when the screen suddenly went black and the words “Connection lost” appeared. Prior to this workshop, both the mothers and daughters participated in a series of dance classes and, with choreographer Elizabeth Johnson, helped develop the dance program. Mothers were graduates of the rehabilitative arts program Journey Home sponsored by ASU Gammage. Choreographer Elizabeth Johnson and dance instructor Teniqua Broughton with the participation of Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office led the program.         

4/5 Ralph Lemon: The Museum Re-Imagined                                                            
(OPEN to the public) 
As a third installment in the Re-Thinking the Museum series, Ralph Lemon, artistic director of Cross Performance, presented work that expand the definition of choreography by crossing and stretching the boundaries between Western, post-modern dance and other art forms and cultures. His form is often a multi-media performance incorporating spoken word and film. He discussed his trans-disciplinary work within the frame of the museum re-imagined and working with diverse communities.

4/6 Third Tent City Jail Tour                                                                                                  
(OPEN to the public with advanced registration: off-site) 
The third bi-weekly tour was offered to twenty museum participants per tour of Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office Tent City Jail. The public could register on the project’s website. Group size was limited to twenty adults over the age of eighteen. Because jails and prisons are the centerpiece of modern criminal justice, these tours were designed to explore the impact of modern criminal justice through direct experience. Tours were conducted by Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office personnel and, by definition, were not expressly artistic or aesthetic. Admission was free.

4/7 Ralph Lemon: Through the Lens of Public Practice                                       
(OPEN to the public) 
Deepening his work with the ASU community, Ralph Lemon conducted an open forum with the Public Practice faculty research group, students and guests.  With a background in dance and choreography, Lemon’s process-based artwork blends performance and cross-disciplinary artistic strategies with identity politics and civil rights concerns. Often engaging social and cross-cultural issues, his focus is on engaging participants from varied backgrounds and with diverse points of view. His projects actively invite participants into the creative process rather than presenting an audience with a finished product.  This method of art-making and engaging social concerns was the focus of the discussions.

4/7 Antoni Muntadas: About Academia and Other Projects
(OPEN to the public)  
Fourth in the series of Re-Thinking the Museum programs, Spanish artist Antoni Muntadas addressed his pioneering conceptual work with social, political and communications issues. His concerns with the relationship between public and private space within social frameworks, as well as his investigations into channels of information and the ways they may be used to censor or promulgate ideas, are presented in different media such as photography, video, publications, the Internet, installations and urban interventions. Muntadas also discussed his exhibition Muntadas: About Academia
(April 8 – June 11) at the ASU Art Museum, as well as other projects that provided context for his recent work.

4/9 Human Rights Film Festival: Militarization of Justice                                                
(OPEN to the public)
Part of the First Annual Human Rights Film Festival at ASU, this program featured a screening of the full-length film Prisoners’ Rights: The Militarization of Justice and three short films -- Cointelpro 101, based on a formal program of the FBI; The Response, addressing issues of national security and military justice; and a video on It's not just black and white. Comments and discussion followed the screenings, with special guests ASU Professor Dr. Alan Gómez, Borderlands Scholar and Assistant Professor of the School of Justice and Social Inquiry, and Scott Henderson of the Tempe Chapter of Amnesty International. The event was organized by the ASU Human Rights Film Festival Committee and co-sponsored by the ASU School of Justice and Social Inquiry and by Amnesty International.

4/12 Maricopa Pretrial Services and Adult Probation                                              
(CLOSED to the public) 
Maricopa County Superior Court Pretrial Services and Adult Probation Units hosted a meeting and conducted a training session for directors and division supervisors. This division interviews inmates in the jails, supervises inmates while they are on leave for work in the community, and oversees probation for those participating in programs such as ALPHA and additional reentry efforts. Penny Stinson and Julie Chavez organized the session.

4/12 Reentry and Preparedness, Inc.                                                             
(gallery OPEN, public may observe)
Reentry and Preparedness, Inc. hosted a meeting of its Board of Directors and Advisory Board. Reentry and Preparedness, Inc. is dedicated to providing green job training, transition training, and mentorship for the families of the ‘re-integrators’ from prisons and jails.  Carol Manetta, Executive Director, organized the session.

4/13     Incarceration and Prison: Hot Topics, Cool Heads                                                                 
(gallery OPEN, public may observe) 
The Civil Dialogue project of the ASU Hugh Downs School of Human Communication focuses on creating a safe space for divergent viewpoints, inviting students and the public to dialogue safely about issues that could be polarizing in an effort to promote understanding. Using this technique of civil dialogue, Clark Olson, Academic Professional of Human Communication, Jennifer Linde, Lecturer and Artistic Director of ASU's Empty Space Theater, and John Genette, President of Black Mountain Communications, facilitated a dialogue focused on two hot topics: incarceration and prisons.

4/13 An ASU and Brookline College Conjoined Lecture and Panel Discussion
(OPEN to the public) 
A reception and introduction to It's not just black and white created a context for this conjoined event with Brookline College's Ethics in Criminal Justice program and ASU’s Department of Women and Gender Studies Women and Social Change class.  The program combined two diverse groups in conversation. The Brookline College guest lecturer, Arizona Department of Corrections Deputy Director Charles Flanagan, spoke for the first portion of the evening on his tenure working in the Arizona Department of Corrections, ethical standards in the criminal justice system, and the difficulties of maintaining educational and rehabilitative programming amidst budgetary challenges and cultural resistance. Brookline College instructor Cathryn Mayers and program director Laurie Wicker organized the first half of the program.

A subsequent round-table discussion, Incarceration: Women and Social Change, considered unique issues facing women in prison. The discussion featured speakers involved in law, activism and justice, including Donna Hamm of Middle Ground Prison Reform; Barbara Broderick, Chief Probation Officer of Maricopa County Adult Probation Department; Sue Ellen Allen of Gina’s Team; and Peggy Plews of Arizona Prison Watch. The panelists shared their experiences within the criminal justice system and their ideas on reforming the prison and jail system.  Organizers of the session included Danica O'Grady, Katelyn Johnston, Kristin D'Souza, and Alesha Durfee. The faculty, students and public members in attendance heard a wide range of views and perspectives before engaging in respectful question-and-answer dialogue.       

4/18 First Visit by Youth from Adobe Mountain and Black Canyon Detention Center  
(CLOSED to the public) 
A collaboration between the Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections and It’s just not black and white brought fifteen male and female juvenile detainees who are completing their high school education on temporary escorted furloughs to the ASU campus for a full day familiarization tour, once a week for three weeks. These youth engaged with ASU students and professors for hands-on activities, and programs with the ASU Schools of Art, Dance, Theatre and Film, and met with administrators of the ASU Herberger College of Design and the Arts. They added their artistic expression to the open public wall within the exhibition/residency gallery space, joined Stephen Gittins’ photography class in the ASU School of Art, and attended a performance and improvisational workshop with Ashley Hare of the ASU School of Theatre and Film.

4/23 United Teams for Restorative Justice                                                               
(galley OPEN: public may observe and participate during Q & A)
 
This panel presentation celebrated five organizations for their tireless efforts in helping the multiple constituencies engaged with the criminal justice system, namely, Moma's House, for its dedication to helping abused women escape abuse and start a new life; Arizona Peace Alliance, for its advocacy for establishing a Department of Peace as a cabinet-level position in the federal government and for legislation aimed at teaching peaceful solutions; Gina's Team, for its work to ensure inmates’ basic life needs are met; Reentry and Preparedness, Inc., for its dedication to support and renew those who have been incarcerated and deliver them gently back into society; and Phoenix Nonviolence Truth Force, for its training in non-violent solutions to everyday problems. David DeLozier, director of United Teams for Restorative Justice, organized this event. United Teams for Restorative Justice is an umbrella organization for groups that envision justice as focusing on the needs of individuals, instead of satisfying abstract legal principles or punishing the offender.

4/23 Fourth Tent City Jail Tour                                                                                                
(OPEN to the public with advanced registration: off-site) 
The fourth bi-weekly tour of Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office Tent City Jail was offered to twenty museum participants. The public could register on the project’s website. Group size was limited to twenty adults over age eighteen. Because jails and prisons are the centerpiece of modern criminal justice, these tours were designed to explore the impact of modern criminal justice through direct experience. Tours were conducted by Maricopa County Sheriff’s officers and, by definition, were not expressly artistic or aesthetic. Admission was free.

4/25 Second Visit by Youth from Adobe Mountain and Black Canyon Detention Center  
(CLOSED to the public) 
On a second visit of the collaboration with the Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections, fifteen youth were led on a walking tour through campus to the Memorial Union for lunch and conversation.  The students, who had been selected to participate due to their demonstrated interest in the arts and their success in high school studies, visited the Nelson Fine Arts Center theater spaces, worked with graduate students through a puppetry workshop, and participated in an open-air choreographed game of tag with Angela’s Ellsworth’s Performance Art class from the ASU School of Art.        

4/26 Maricopa Adult Probation Executive Management                                          
(CLOSED to the public) The Maricopa Adult Probation Executive Management Team held its monthly meeting in the gallery. The team consists of a Chief Probation Officer, three Deputy Chief Probation Officers and eleven Division Directors.  Maricopa Adult Probation has about 1,100 employees and supervise a monthly average of 58,000 probationers. The team meets monthly to focus on the strategic plan, managing for results and departmental goals in order to ensure that the departmental mission is realized. Organized by Therese Wagner.

4/26 Incarceration and the Mentally Ill: Punitive or Restorative Justice?
(gallery OPEN: public may observe and participate during Q & A) 
This structured dialogue considered the disproportionately high rate of mental disorders and limited access to mental health services within the corrections system. The range of participants included individuals who had lost loved ones as a result of neglect while incarcerated, professionals advocating for increased rehabilitation programs, and public officials including Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery and Arizona Department of Corrections Director Charles Ryan. The session brought together individuals with diverse perspectives and experiences, from those advocating to increase rehabilitation of mentally ill offenders, to those who feel the criminal justice system in place in Arizona is working well. The event was co-organized by Mary Lou Brnick of the non-profit organization David's Hope, moderated by Kathy Bashor and Cynthia Henry, and supported by the Office of Individual and Family Affairs at the Arizona Department of Behavioral Health Services and the Arizona Mental Health and Criminal Justice Coalition.

4/29 Considering Matters ofVisual Cultureand Incarceration
(CLOSED/OPEN by invitation) 
A formally structured roundtable discussion, Considering Matters of Visual Culture and Incarceration, featured participants representing integral parts of the criminal justice system participating in a program that considered the prison industrial complex through focusing on the visual language of incarceration.  Participants included Joe Arpaio, Sheriff, Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office; Frantz Beasley, former convict and director, AZ Common Ground (a collation of re-entry organizations); Barbara Broderick, Chief Probation Officer, Maricopa County Adult Probation Department; Jeremy Mussman, Deputy Director, Public Defender Office; Gordon Knox, Director, ASU Art Museum; Jerry Sheridan, Chief, Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office; Richard Toon, Director of ASU Museum Studies; Doris Marie Provine, Professor, ASU School of Justice and Social Inquiry; Amira de la Garza, ASU Associate Professor and Southwest Borderlands Scholar; and Arthur Sabatini, ASU Associate Professor of Performance Studies; as well as other elected officials, victims’ families, parolees, police officers, members of the community, media representatives, artists, scholars and researchers.

A formal structure of three twenty-minute dialogues, followed by a brief question-and-answer period, fostered unprecedented working relationships among diverse constituents.  Afterwards, the event was opened for discussion with those gathered at the table and then with the audience of 175. In organizing and moderating the invitation-only discussions, and by managing media access, this program effectively demonstrated how a museum can function as an open forum for civil discourse.

MAY

5/2  Third Visit by Youth from Adobe Mountain and Black Canyon Detention Center
(CLOSED to the public) 
The third and final visit to ASU campus by fifteen male and female juvenile detainees with Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections focused on tearing down the open graffiti wall that had been created at the museum to hold the writings and drawings of inmates, project attendees, constituents and the public. With notebooks and disposable cameras, the youth archived the cumulative community contributions.  A group reflection and sharing conversation lead into the discussion on ideas concerning the best approach for tearing down of the wall. Working with Gregory Sale, the students began working with saws, hammers, crowbars, and drills on the back of the wall, dismantling the drywall from the aluminum stud structure. Once the wall was freed, ladders were place on the back of the wall so that the students could position themselves to push from the top to the bottom. On the count of three, everyone pushed, and the wall fell to the floor in one large piece.

5/4 Fifth Tent City Jail Tour                                                                                                    
(OPEN to the public with advanced registration: off-site) 
The fifth bi-weekly tour of Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office Tent City Jail was offered to twenty museum participants. The public could register on the project’s website. Group size was limited to twenty adults over age eighteen. Because jails and prisons are the centerpiece of modern criminal justice, these tours were designed to explore the impact of modern criminal justice through direct experience. Tours were conducted by Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office personnel and, by definition, were not expressly artistic or aesthetic. Admission was free.

5/4 Angela Davis, Incarceration or Education? The Future of Democracy        
(OPEN to the public: lecture at Neeb Hall. Book signing and performance in gallery) 
Noted scholar, activist and author Angela Davis, who herself was incarcerated for eighteen months in the 1970s, discussed her ideas about incarceration. Her work as an educator, both at the university level and in the larger public sphere, has always emphasized the importance of building communities of struggle for economic, racial, and gender equality. She is especially concerned with the tendency to devote more resources and attention to the prison system than to educational institutions. Davis posited that very future of democracy depends on our ability to develop radical practices that make it possible to create a world beyond the prison industrial complex. 

Her talk was introduced by Neal Lester, ASU Dean of Humanities and followed by a question-answer session moderated by Gregory Sale.  A reception followed the lecture at the ASU Art Museum.  Davis signed copies of her books, including “Are Prisons Obsolete?” and "Abolition Democracy: Beyond Prisons, Torture, and Empire."  The reception also featured a live dance performance of Days/Months/Years with Grisha Coleman, Eden McNutt, Sam Pilafian, Eileen Standley, and Monica Page Subia (including faculty from the Schools of Music, Dance, and Arts Media and Engineering.) The interdisciplinary program was supported directly by ASU Project Humanities.

5/7 Training for Community Volunteers Working with the Recently Released
(OPEN to the public for observation) 
The final week of the project kicked off with a program of training for community volunteers working with the recently released, led by the National Advocacy and Training Network through Support, Education, Empowerment and Directions. The seven-hour training was conducted for volunteer mentors who provide educational programming for women incarcerated at Perryville Prison, teenaged girl at Mingus Mountain Estate Residential Center, and transitional housing for women who have been incarcerated, and who have been victims of violence and are in recovery. The National Advocacy and Training Network through Support, Education, Empowerment and Directions are an approved support organization within the Arizona Department of Corrections.

5/9 Adult Probation Division Meeting                                                                                   
(CLOSED to the public) 
A working meeting of the Adult Probation Division unit, attended of probation officers and supervisors, to review materials that provide effective methods of working with offenders, understanding and addressing their specific needs, and teaching officers skills they need to change behaviors. In addition, they reviewed agency policies regarding the use of court forms and documentation. Organized by Anna King.

5/9 Painting Out the Stripes: Former Inmates Revisit                                                           
(OPEN to the public)  
In the final week of the residency exhibition, five collaborators who helped paint black-and-white stripes on the gallery walls while they were inmates of the Maricopa County Jail returned to the Museum. Now released, Joshua, Michael, Grayson, James and Erik led an effort to paint out the stripes. Dressed in their civilian clothes and on their own time, they joined the curator, the artistic collaborators and Gregory Sale for lunch together in the space.

5/10 Walking Meditation                                                                                    
(OPEN to the public) 
The final week of the residency exhibition provided opportunities for reflection and completion. Conscious Connections led a walking meditation that commenced from the gallery space. The organization specializes in yoga and meditation study with at-risk and diverse communities.

5/10 Changing the Face of Re-Entry: South Mountain Re-Entry Coalition           
(OPEN to the public) 
AZ Common Ground and its partners, South Mountain Re-Entry Coalition, Kingdom Communities of the Valley (KCV), and the Phoenix Police Department, presented the history, evolution and success of the community engagement model that is changing the face of re-entry. In the South Mountain region of Phoenix, an innovative coalition of stakeholders has been formed to address the various issues associated with re-entry. Mike Kurtenbach and Sean Connolly, Resource Lieutenants of the Phoenix South Mountain Police Precinct, described a program designed for constituents from two zip codes in south Phoenix with the highest concentration in Arizona of individuals going in and out of prison. This coalition is made up of a group of committed partners who have dedicated many resources to support an initiative being spearheaded by formerly incarcerated individuals that is "changing the face of re-entry.”  The success of the community-engagement model is influencing policies of the Phoenix Police Department and is being emulated in Houston and Miami. This program was organized by Frantz Beasley of AZ Common Ground.

5/12 Painting Out the Stripes: Former Inmates Revisit
(OPEN to the public)
 
For a second day, a small group of former inmates who helped paint the black and white stripes on the gallery walls in February, and who had completed their sentences, returned to the museum to paint the black stripes white. These men reaffirmed the impact of the work by their commitment to dismantle the imagery of the space that had been visually charged by these stripes over the three-month residency/exhibition period.

5/12 A Visit and Contemplation with Prison Visitors                                                                      
(OPEN to the public)
 
A group of individuals who are trained in association with the national organization Prison Visitors came together with Museum staff and project collaborators for a conversation and contemplation. Those who led the conversation had been specially trained and approved to visit federal and military institutions. Their visits offer help and moral support to survive incarceration, to live constructive lives and to maintain self-esteem. For many prisoners, these visitors are the only contact they have with the outside world. Their insight and conversation during the afternoon transpired into a silent reflection period as the group concluded its day at the museum.

5/14     A One-hour Introduction to Meditation Originally Developed for Sing Sing
(OPEN to the public) 
The gallery hosted a one-hour introduction to meditation, led by Haryaksha, a follower of Sri Chinmoy for over twenty years. Sri Chinmoy says, “It's through meditation that we recognize who we are and free ourselves from what binds us.” The session began with a concentration exercise, the basic building block of a meditation practice.

5/14 Painting Out the Stripes: Former Inmates Revisit                                                           
(OPEN to the public) 
The last day of the project was marked by the return of formerly-jailed collaborators, who put finishing touches on the black stripes to make them white. The space was returned to a white box gallery of sorts, with hints of what had occurred still present. The artists and painting collaborators joined for one last lunch together before project ended. To conclude the project, collaborators and public were invited to join in the one-hour introduction to meditation, to conclude the thought-provoking project and move forward from what has been experienced.

OCTOBER

10/28 It’s not just black and white: the Afterlife
(OPEN to the public) 
Five months after the project’s completion, artist Gregory Sale moderated a panel at the Light It Up 2011: Optimizing Public Practice conference, Herberger Institute of Design and the Arts, ASU.  Because It’s not just black and white existed as a public experience, it was critical to gather project feedback in a public setting. The panel provided an opportunity to gather reflections, impacts and experiences of the project, to share direct outcomes and to reconnect.  Participants shared some of the complex and intangible reverberations of the project.  For example, the Chief Probation Officer of Maricopa County described how the neutral, apolitical site of the museum accommodated an unexpected coming-together of individuals with diverse perspectives and power bases.

The panelists included:  Frantz Beasley, former convict and President/CEO, AZ Common Ground; Barbara Broderick, Chief Probation Officer, Maricopa County; Adam Henning, Principal, Adobe Mountain and Black Canyon high schools, Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections; Elizabeth Johnson, choreographer, Coordinator, Public Practice, ASU Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts; Amy Rex, Manager, Maricopa County Criminal Justice Projects, Maricopa County Manager’s Office; Arthur J. Sabatini, PhD, Associate Professor of Performance Studies, Humanities, Arts and Culture, ASU College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences; Matthew Salenger, architect, artist, and It’s not just black and white advisor board member; Mary Ellen Sheppard, Deputy Chief, Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office; John Spiak, Director and Curator, Grand Central Art Center, University of California Fullerton; and Gregory Sale. (Invited participants Michael Koveikis, former inmate and ALPHA Program graduate and general contractor, and Jane Lindsay, artist and MFA candidate, ASU School of Art, were unable to attend.)